Thursday, October 27, 2005

separation of church and state

Why, oh why can't Matt Santos be president. I suppose the fact that he's a fictional character on The West Wing could be a problem. I just watched the episode (Mr. Frost) where he talks about his stance on the separation of church and state and I just wish real politicians could sound so reasonable.

Here's an excerpt from a scene of Matt Santos on his views of the separation of church and state from www.televisionwithoutpity.com.


Santos is speaking about education to a classroom full of parents and teachers. He finishes his speech and starts to take questions. The first one comes from a tenth-grade science teacher, who asks him bluntly, "Do you believe in the theory of intelligent design?" Santos tells her, "As a Catholic who attends church every Sunday, I do believe in God, and my faith tells me that there was a designer
behind it all." The next question comes from an English teacher at the school, who asks Santos whether he believes in the theory of evolution. Santos tells him that he thinks it would be pretty hard to teach much of science without evolution, and that he does believe in it. He continues, "I don't think it's contradictory to believe in science and believe in God." The English teacher goes on to ask whether Santos thinks that intelligent design should be taught alongside evolution in public schools. Santos: "Absolutely not. One is based on science, and one is based on faith. Intelligent design is not a scientific theory. It's a religious belief."

2 comments:

sacred vapor said...

unfortunately, Santos is mistaking Intelligent Design for Creationism. The problem with the neo-darwinist kind of evolution (also taught in public schools) is that it teaches evolution via the philosophical stance that evolution happens because of random mutation and natural selection.

The ID argument is that because of the inner complexities of the cell, DNA, information coding, etc... that it is improbable that this be a random and blind process, but rather guided by some kind of intelligence.

This is a form of scientific inquiry, also used in sciences like forensics, SETI, etc... and is now being proposed in Biology. This is not about religion, and certainly not about Biblical creationism.

like your blogs... shalom,
paul

Kim said...

Thanks for your comments paul. I still disagree. Today I heard an actual politician that I actually like talk about ID on NPR. Jimmy Carter feels that religious leaders are using ID to try and insert their faith into the scientific classroom. It seems like that to me too.